Invasive species Ringneck Parrot ( Psittacula krameri ) shot by a man in London

January 10th, 2015 | by LubosTomiska
Invasive species Ringneck Parrot ( Psittacula krameri ) shot by a man in London
Invasive species
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VIDEO IN – Strong criticism is aimed at James Marchington. Cause? He put a new video recording on youtube where describes the technique how to shoot invasive species Indian Ringneck Parrot (Psittacula krameri) in London. Parrots comming from Asia inhabit few english cities and feed on fruits and berries in parks and gardens. James Marchington decided to declare war on them to save his crop. In the mentioned manual he shows the preparation of a bait which lures Indian Ringneck Parrot to come to the feeder. Consequently, the guy shoots these birds.

James took an imitation of a magpie, painted it on light green with dark green backs and wings, a pink beak and the characteristic black ring. Then he put it next to the feeder and waited until the first parrot will appear. Finally, hidden behind the window was shooting comming parrots with an air gun with lens. „We can settle one’s accounts with them now because they are on the list of invasive species allowed to shoot since 2013,“ James commented his video. „I would like to warn everybody who wants to find inspiration in this video that such person can end with having a criminal record. Shooting of invasive species is allowed only in unique cases when the large damage on your property or the public health occurs,“ explained the spokesman of the Royal Society for Conservation of Birds.

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Invasive species can be killed under strict conditions

The same organization points out that James Marchington justifies himself by the argument that these birds damaged his fruits in the garden. However, the video record of shooting parrots was taken in November when all trees don’t have any fruits. „There was not fruit as no damage arised. The shooter even lure hungry birds on his feeder so he takes chances to have a criminal record,“ spokesman explained. Another offence is shooting by a gun in the center of London. Marchington has been established by authorities and ornithologists as unhinged. British law permits killing of invasive species which cause damage but only under strict conditions. That’s why Indian Ringneck Parrot share the same category with pigeons, magpies or crows. Shooters have to prove that killed animals cause damages on their property or spread diseases.

READ  Seychellois government has spent one million US dollars to eradicate invasive parrots

According to the latest estimates, in whole Great Britain we can find about 50 000 wild Indian Ringnecks. Apart from London they live also in Manchester, Birmingham, Oxford, Edinburgh and other cities. Parrots stay close to people, parks and gardens where food sources can be found. In the winter Brits often provide them supplemental food together with native species. What is more, in cities there is always higher temperature than in open areas so birds can survive the cold season. Indian Ringneck Parrot is not the only London parrot. There are also other species considered as pests. The problem with invasive species Indian Ringneck Parrot and Quaker Parrots (Myiopsitta monachus) as well is solved in more european countries. Spain has even imposed a ban on their breeding in captivity

Title photo: © Frank Vassen. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

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5 Comments

  1. Pingback: Shooting of Indian Ringneck Parrots! - Parrot Forum - Parrot Owner's Community

  2. Rancho Papagayo says:

    Quite Disturbing! It reminds me Australia though!

  3. Fuck off crazy idiot!

  4. Oneball says:

    If you ever had one in your orchard you will shoot ringsnecks.
    They damage every apple or other fruit in a tree.
    They eat only one seed from every piece of fruit.

    • barry says:

      shame we cant all get along why not net the tree when fruiting lots of birds eat fruit not just ringnecks

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