A Guide to Incubation and Hand raising Lories. PART II

December 10th, 2015 | by Chris Touchton
A Guide to Incubation and Hand raising Lories. PART II
Breeding
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Read also the first part of this article:

A Guide to Incubation and Hand raising Lories. PART I

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I have saved some and have lost some to aspiration over the years (I day one over 200 chicks a year so the odds are that it does happen I hate it.) Feed a just hatched chick just after their first defecation (this one is a very dark green) their body will now draw nutrients from the crop digestive system as opposed to the yolk. Sometimes if you feed prior to that dark green defecation the yolk can go rancid with in the body.

If the chick was out in the nestbox and you dont know if this has occurred turn the chick up side down and look at the back end if you dont see a black line it has already occurred (fecal matter in the large intestine). Their skin in the belly/abdomen area is a a bit transparent at this age. To day one a chick hold the chick in your left hand (only if you are right handed of course) on its back (gently securing the head between your thumb and pointer finger) if you have any trouble holding on to the chick, place the chick in a tissue on its back and that will secure it in that position for you while in your hand.

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(c)Chris Touchton

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For some reason they prefer to feed on their backs (with me and with the parents) at this age. With the syringe (I use a 1 to 3 cc for day ones then bump up to 5cc on 7 to 16 day olds ending up with 10 cc until weaning) in your right hand come in from the right (chicks left) angling the tip down and to the left. Dispense slowly. If the chick slows down prior to being full or doesnt have a feeding response at the beginning of feeding, squirt out a little of the mix from the syringe into a cup or sink.

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That usually gets you down into a little warmer fluid because it looses heat in the tip quite quick. Like I said earlier you will feed the formula a little thinner. I mix my cup of food up when feeding as per directions then draw the food into the syringe from the top level of the mixed solution (which tends to be a little thinner). Definitely try and stretch the crop when feeding (by feeding just a little more when you think the bump is just slightly slack) Make the crop tight. By the time I am weaning most of my Lories (rainbow and eos)are 15 to 20 ccs. The larger types are taking 20 to 30 ccs. I find they eat better as adults.

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If a chick comes in from the nest cold NEVER feed a chick that is physically cold. Warm the chick up first then feed. Do not use food to “warm it up” ever. You can aspirate a lethargic chick. By the time they are about two weeks old they start to prefer feeding while they are sitting in an upright position. Fostering/breeding tidbits on fostering (Lory to Lory) I would try and keep the age of the eggs with each other with in days (two days from the last egg that the incubating/foster hen laid). They will do three eggs within the same age range.

If you try four or more you probably will lose the whole clutch–one egg rolls out and dies she rolls it back in then another rolls out and dies etc. If the ages are too far apart she may think the eggs are no good and cancel the clutch. If the pair is breeding get the eggs out of there. Most of the Lory species are interchangeable. Just be careful if you put a larger specie in with a smaller species (or vise versa) the growth rate will be quite different and the larger specie even though younger may get the bulk of the food and bump the other kid off.

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Chattering Lory, fallow mutation (c) Chris Touchton

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If you have a good pair and they are going to lay but your egg eating pair has laid you can take each egg as it is laid (make sure the egg is not warm from her sitting). After the egg is laid they cool down then the hen sits and the set point is activated and the incubation period has started. If you can get the cooled or just laid egg you can store it for several days in a room temp dark place. Then when the good parents lay you can put the egg under them–as soon as the first egg is laid.

The fostering method usually takes two pairs to incubate one egg trashing pair’s eggs, because the foster parents lay two eggs also. It is very funny to see a pair mating and when other pairs see or hear that they get in the mood. I like to place prolific pairs next to or near others to inspire them. Chronic egg/chick trashing behavior is very hard to correct. Rarely after trashing clutch after clutch after clutch will they will settle down. I just day one everyone to avoid having that problem at all. It’s not fair to the chicks. At least I am not trying to kill them.

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Read also the first part of this article:

A Guide to Incubation and Hand raising Lories. PART I

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author: (c) Chris Touchton

Title photo: (c) Chris Touchton

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